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                       Events SEPTEMBER  30, Yoshida-selected
                                      From  Wikipedia Septedmber 30
Wikipedia(English edition)(September 30:"NONE
"
The article concerned:"HIROHITO EXTOLS JAPANESE‐U.S TIES"
                                   "The Emperor and Empress Visit the United States"
                           (The 49-photo-attached file/243.96KB)

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                 "The Emperor and Empress Visit the United States"

In the fall of 1975, Emperor Hirohito and Empress Nagako visited the United States for the first time in U.S.-Japanese history. They were warmly welcomed as they visited Washington D.C, New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Honolulu. In Washington D.C, the imperial couple attended a White House dinner with President Gerald Ford that was held in honor of the two visitors from Japan.

In his speech at the state dinner, the Emperor said, "It has been my wish for many years to visit the United States. There is one thing in particular which I have hoped to convey to the American people, should my visit be materialized; that is, to extend in my own words my gratitude to the people of the United States for the friendly hand of goodwill and assistance their great country afforded us for our post-war reconstruction immediately following that most unfortunate war, which I deeply deplore." His remarks were greeted with great applause, and the dinner party exceeded its official end time and continued until midnight.("HIROHITO EXTOLS JAPANESE‐U.S TIES")

WASHINGTON, Oct. 2—Welcomed by President Ford amid all the pomp the White House can muster, Emperor Hirohito today voiced regret about World War II and said he hoped his visit would contribute to “everlasting friendship” between the people of Japan and the United States.

Replying to President Ford's greeting as they stood side by side on the crowded South Lawn of the White House, the Emperor said, “Our peoples withstood the challenges of one tragic interlude when the Pacific. Ocean, symbol of tranquillity, was instead a rough and stormy sea, and have built today unchanging ties of friendship and goodwill.”

Later, in a toast at a state banquet in his honor at the White House, the Emperor expressed himself in even stronger terms. He wished to extend, he said, according to the official Japanese translation, “my gratitude to the people of the United States for the friendly hand of goodwill and assistance their great country accorded us for our postwar reconstruction, immediately following that most unfortunate war, which I deeply deplore.”

Several Japanese correspondents here said that the Japanese text of the toast was less strong in expressing regret and added that they believed the statement was intended to be heard somewhat more softly in Japan itself. This was denied by the Emperor's spokesman, Naraichi Fujiyama.

In any case, both Japanese and American officials here said privately that the Emperor's statements were meant to express in a subtle way regret for Japan's role in World War II.

This first state visit by a Japanese Emperor was described as an indication that the Japanese Government wished to close the books once and for all on World War II as an issue between the United States and Japan, as well as to underscore the current untroubled relations between the two nations.

The current state visit is also a reflection of the desires of the Emperor himself, who said that “it has been my wish for many years to visit the United States.”

President Ford did not allude to the war in his welcoming address. He did say: “this first state visit for an Emperor and Empress of Japan to the United States is an historic occasion with profound importance. Japan and the United States have a special and unique relationship since the days when Commodore Perry sailed to Japan more than 120 years ago.”

Japanese Anthem Played

The Emperor and Empress emerged from their limousine onto the South Lawn amid flourishes played on long trumpets by marines in dress uniform arrayed along the South Portico of the White House. Then the Emperor and Mr. Ford stood at attention on a raised platform as a marine band, clad in scarlet tunics and white trousers and caps, played the Japanese national anthem“Kimigayo,” or “The Reign of Our Emperor”—amid a 21‐gun salute.

After The Star‐Spangled Banner, the President accompanied the Emperor in reviewing a military honor guard. They then returned to the, platform and, after Mr. Ford's greeting, the 74‐year‐old Emperor read his speech in a firm voice.

Emperor Hirohito is credited with helping end the war, when some of Japan's military leaders wanted to fight on despite the atomic destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. He has often been described as a passive figure surrounded by militarists during the war period. Some American scholars, however, have described the Emperor as a dedicated war leader.

President Ford, as a Navy officer fought against the Japanese in many of the important battles of the Pacific.

This afternoon, the Emperor paid a visit to the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. An ardent and accomplished marine biologist, the Emperor examined a group of rare deep sea organisms called hydroids which are related to corals and sea anemones.

The secretary of the museum, S. Dillon Ripley, presented him with what was described as a highly prized specimen of the Caribbean slit‐shell.

Earlier, during the welcoming ceremony, a small single engine plane flew visibly by the White House bearing a streamer that said “Emperor Hirohito save our Whales.” His spokesman said that the Emperor did not see the plane.

An official with the Federal Aviation Administration said that air traffic controllers had reported that the plane did not violate proscribed airspace over the White House and that there fore there was no plan to file charges.

The pianist Van Cliburn per. formed at the white‐tie dinner The menu included lobster en bellevue, medallions of veal with wild rice, green beans nicoise, endive and watercress salad, fresh raspberry mousse with petit fours and demitasse

One guest at tonight's dinner said that it was hard to tell if the Emperor was enjoying himself, but that Empress Nagako was obviously having a wonderful time, laughing and talking animatedly to the President and Secretary of State Kissinger.

The guest also noticed that the Americans present shook hands With the Emperor, while the Japanese greeted the Emperor with a formal bow.

The guest added that Mr. Cliburn had played pieces by Chopin, Debussy, and Schumann. But he said that most of the talk from the Americans present revolved around the Emperor's expression of regret about World War II.

 

9月30日 September 30

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