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                                             Today@VOA
                                             No.756   
"On August 20, 1975, the Viking I space probe launches from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on its way to Mars."
        "1975 Viking 1 launched to Mars-HISTORY"     "Viking 1-Wikipedia "      
                       (The 44-11-line-photo-attached/301.67KB/27.4KB/Line)

On This Day in American History
5
On August 20, 1975, the Viking I space probe launches from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on its way to Mars. It took until June 19 of the following year for the spacecraft to reach the red planet, and once there, it spent the first month in orbit scouting for a good spot for its lander, which touched down on July 20, 1976. It was the first American probe to land on the Martian surface. The USSR landed a probe earlier, but it failed seconds after landing. The same day Viking I landed, it sent back the first close-up photograph of Mars’ surface. The last contact with the spacecraft was on November 11, 1982.

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"Curiosity takes its first close-up photos of Mars, captures a partial solar eclipse by Phobos, and more-EXTREME TECH"
    
Rock sample Jake Matijevic, as seen by Curiosity's NavcamCuriosity's robot arm (APXS + MAHLI) inspecting Jake MatijevicThree photos taken by MAHLI of rock sample Jake MatijevicCuriosity's progress towards Glenelg, as of day 43 
     The US flag medallion, on the Curiosity roverPhobos transiting the Sun, as seen by Curiosity from the surface of Mars
  Image result for wikipediaViking spacecraft.jpgFile:Documentary clip of Viking 1 landing (JPL-19760720-VIKINGf-0002-AVC2002151).webm
                                  "1975 Viking 1 launched to Mars-HISTORY"
Viking 1, an unmanned U.S. planetary probe, is launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on a mission to Mars.

On June 19, 1976, the spacecraft entered into orbit around Mars and devoted the next month to imaging the Martian surface with the purpose of finding an appropriate landing site for its lander. On July 20–the seventh anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing–the Viking 1 lander separated from the orbiter and touched down on the Chryse Planitia region, becoming the first spacecraft to successfully land on the surface of Mars. The same day, the craft sent back the first close-up photographs of the rust-colored Martian surface.

In September 1976, Viking 2–launched only three weeks after Viking 1–entered into orbit around Mars, where it assisted Viking 1 in imaging the surface and also sent down a lander. During the dual Viking missions, the two orbiters imaged the entire surface of Mars at a resolution of 150 to 300 meters, and the two landers sent back more than 1,400 images of the planet’s surface.

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