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                                      No.541(10.6. 2018)

"On October 5, 1947, President Harry Truman gives the first presidential speech ever to be broadcast on television. "   
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1947  First presidential speech on TV(HISTORY)
                              (The 28-photo-attached/213.48KB)  

On This Day in American History
On October 5, 1947, President Harry Truman gives the first presidential speech ever to be broadcast on television. The thrust of the speech was to urge Americans to reduce their consumption of grains so that the United States could help starving Europeans struggling to rebuild after World War II. Truman was reportedly worried that if the U.S. didn’t provide food to Europeans, the Marshall Plan would unravel. He urged Americans to not eat meat on Tuesdays and to avoid egg and poultry on Thursdays. He also urged Americans to try to save a slice of bread each day.

  Image result for On October 5, 1947, President Harry Truman gives the first-ever televised presidential address from the White House.Image result for On October 5, 1947, President Harry Truman gives the first-ever televised presidential address from the White House. Image result for On October 5, 1947, President Harry Truman gives the first-ever televised presidential address from the White House.  Image result for On October 5, 1947, President Harry Truman gives the first-ever televised presidential address from the White House.
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 Image result for Europe is in the midst of a famine in the aftermath of World War II.Image result for Europe is in the midst of a famine in the aftermath of World War II.Image result for Europe is in the midst of a famine in the aftermath of World War II.Image result for Europe is in the midst of a famine in the aftermath of World War II.   Related image
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  Image result for 1939Image result for Franklin Roosevelt who was the first president to appear on TV–from the World’s Fair in New York City on April 30, 1939.Image result for Franklin Roosevelt, the World’s Fair in New York City Image result for Franklin Roosevelt, the World’s Fair in New York CityImage result for Franklin Roosevelt who was the first president to appear on TV–from the World’s Fair in New York City on April 30, 1939.
  Image result for the World’s Fair in New York City with televisionImage result for Franklin Roosevelt who was the first president to appear on TV–from the World’s Fair in New York City on April 30, 1939.Image result for the World’s Fair in New York City with television        Related image
                  "1947  First presidential speech on TV(HISTORY)"
On this day in 1947, President Harry Truman (1884-1972) makes the first-ever televised presidential address from the White House, asking Americans to cut back on their use of grain in order to help starving Europeans.

At the time of Truman’s food-conservation speech, Europe was still recovering from World War II and suffering from famine. Truman, the 33rd commander in chief, worried that if the U.S. didn’t provide food aid, his administration’s Marshall Plan for European economic recovery would fall apart. He asked farmers and distillers to reduce grain use and requested that the public voluntarily forgo meat on Tuesdays, eggs and poultry on Thursdays and save a slice of bread each day. The food program was short-lived, as ultimately the Marshall Plan succeeded in helping to spur economic revitalization and growth in Europe.

In 1947,television was still in its infancy and the number of TV sets in U.S. homes only numbered in the thousands (by the early 1950s, millions of Americans owned TVs); most people listened to the radio for news and entertainment. However, although the majority of Americans missed Truman’s TV debut, his speech signaled the start of a powerful and complex relationship between the White House and a medium that would have an enormous impact on the American presidency, from how candidates campaigned for the office to how presidents communicated with their constituents.

Each of Truman’s subsequent White House speeches, including his 1949 inauguration address, was televised. In 1948, Truman was the first presidential candidate to broadcast a paid political ad. Truman pioneered the White House telecast, but it was President Franklin Roosevelt who was the first president to appear on TV–from the World’s Fair in New York City on April 30, 1939. FDR’s speech had an extremely limited TV audience, though, airing only on receivers at the fairgrounds and at Radio City in Manhattan.